Keynote

APRIS2020 Keynote:

“Software Engineering and Shlaer-Mellor”

Stephen Mellor, Chief Technical Officer

STEPHEN MELLOR, CHIEF TECHNICAL OFFICER Stephen Mellor is the Chief Technical Officer for the Industrial Internet Consortium, where he aligns groups for business, technology, rustworthiness and industry for the Industrial Internet. 

He is a well-known technology consultant on methods for the construction of real-time and embedded systems, a signatory to the Agile Manifesto, and one-iime adjunct professor at the Australian National University in Canberra, ACT, Australia. Stephen is the author of Structured Development for Real-Time Systems, Object Lifecycles, Executable UML, MDA Distilled and Models to Code.

Stephen was Chief Scientist of the Embedded Software Division at Mentor Graphics, and founder and past-president of Project Technology, Inc., before its acquisition. He participated in multiple UML and modeling-related activities at the Object Management Group (OMG), and was a member of the OMG Architecture Board, which is the final technical gateway for all OMG standards. Stephen was the Chairman of the Advisory Board to IEEE Software for ten years and a two-time Guest Editor of the magazine.

Stephen Mellor is the Chief Technical Officer for the Industrial Internet Consortium, where he aligns groups for business, technology, trustworthiness and industry for the Industrial Internet. 

Abstract

Software engineering has a long and (in)glorious history, preceded and partnered by computer science. Stephen Mellor took one of the first computer science degrees back in 1974 (shhh!) and has been working in software engineering and related areas since. As author of two major software development approaches (structured and object-oriented) and a signatory to the Agile Manifesto, he has been involved in many facets of the industry.

This keynote presentation will take a long view, from the beginnings to where we are today. It will place some key developments into context and draw out some successes and failures of these methods, particularly Shlaer-Mellor and xtUML, along the way. It will include non-technical issues, such as standards and business requirements.